A "Century" Overdue: Revisiting the Doctrine of Spoliation in the Age of Electronic Documents

Authors

  • Gideon Christian

Abstract

Spoliation in the context of civil litigation occurs when a party intentionally destroys, mutilates, alters, or conceals evidence, typically documents, that are relevant to litigation. Spoliation has become easier than ever with the advent and rise of electronically stored information. This article gives a brief overview of the history of spoliation and criteria required to trigger the need to preserve documents relevant to litigation. Following this overview, the article identifies the issues with the current remedies for spoliation in Canada and points to the advances the United States has made to address this pressing issue. The article concludes with recommendations for further research into spoliation in Canada.

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Published

2022-07-06

Issue

Section

Articles