Morrow Essay Contest

The Honourable Justice William Morrow was born in Edmonton in 1917 and enrolled in law at the University of Alberta in 1934. He graduated with distinction and was called to the bar in 1940. His legal career was put on hold while he served in the navy during the Second World War. Justice Morrow served with distinction and was recognized by King George V, alongside a number of Albertans, for showing extraordinary resource, leadership, and devotion to duty. 


Following the war, Justice Morrow’s courage and passion for service translated well into his legal practice. He was well-known for taking difficult and unpopular cases for little or no monetary reward. He viewed law as a profession that extended beyond mere business, and believed judges and lawyers had a duty to ensure that every individual had an opportunity to be heard. 


Over time, Justice Morrow developed a reputation for his ability to handle important litigation matters, and in particular, for his appellate skill. He appeared before every court in Alberta, British Columbia, and the Northwest Territories. He also appeared before the Supreme Court of Canada on ten leave applications and on 21 appeals and had the distinction of arguing the very last Canadian case to go before the Judicial Committee of the Privy Council, Ponoka-Calmar Oils Ltd. et al. v. Earl F. Wakefield Co. et al.

 

Justice Morrow left a lasting mark on the law of Alberta through his litigation practice. He was a pioneer of oil and gas law in the province. He was counsel in many important cases regarding real property rights in Alberta, cases which were fundamental to the developing law of the young province. 

 

Throughout his practice, Justice Morrow was, above all, a fierce and fearless advocate of the rights of his clients. His tireless work to see that those rights were upheld, exemplified the idea of legal advocacy as an instrument of justice.

 

Justice Morrow also developed a special relationship with the northern peoples and lands of Canada. Access to justice in the North was a key goal for Justice Morrow, who in 1960 volunteered to go on circuit in the Northwest Territories as defence counsel. This was an arduous and unpaid task, which he nevertheless took up with his usual passion. 

 

Justice Morrow’s contributions to justice in the North were marked by his insistence that the law must take into account the local conditions, beliefs, and customs of aboriginal people living in the North, both in civil and criminal contexts. His dedication to northern issues led to his appointment as the second justice of the Territorial Court of the Northwest Territories in 1966. As a judge in the North, Justice Morrow worked to ensure that his court was accessible to the local community, holding court in living rooms, dance halls, schoolhouses, and even on a float plane on the open water. This wasn’t the only time he operated out of a plane – on another occasion, he heard submissions on a custom adoption while airborne, making him one of the very few people ever to sit as a judge on land, air, and sea.

 

 

The William Morrow Essay Contest is endowed by the Honourable Mr. Justice William Stevenson in memory of the late Mr. Justice Morrow. Justice Stevenson graduated from the University of Alberta Faculty of Law in 1957. He was a founding editor of the Alberta Law Review and a recipient of the Horace Harvey Gold Medal in Law. After graduation, he articled, and then practiced, with Justice Morrow. The two men worked together on many cases, including the last Canadian case to go before the Judicial Committee of the Privy Council: Ponoka-Calmar Oils Ltd. et al. v. Earl F. Wakefield Co. et al. Justice Morrow invited Justice Stevenson to become a partner at Morrow Morrow Reynolds and Stevenson (now Reynolds Mirth Farmer & Richards). Justice Stevenson later became a lecturer at the University of Alberta in 1963 and served as a full faculty member for several years before returning to private practice in 1970. He was appointed to the District Court of Alberta in 1975 and the Court of Queen's Bench of Alberta in 1979. A year later, he was appointed to the Alberta Court of Appeal where he and Justice Morrow were again colleagues for a time. On 17 September 1990, Justice Stevenson was elevated to the Supreme Court of Canada, where he served until he retired on 5 June 1992.

 

Justice Stevenson made an invaluable contribution to the law in Alberta and Canada. He had extraordinary ability, dedication, and personal and professional ethics, and loved working with younger lawyers and inspiring and instructing them.


DEADLINE

The deadline for entries is January 8, 2021.


RULES 

  1. The essays should be on a topic of current legal interest. For purposes of the category of Law or Administration of Justice in the North, the North includes the Northwest Territories, Nunavut, and the Yukon Territory.

  2. The criteria used in judging will be (1) Originality, (2) Accuracy, and (3) Writing Style.

  3. Papers must be typed double-spaced and should comply with the Canadian Guide to Uniform Legal Citation, 9th ed (McGill Guide). Maximum length of essays is 50 pages.

  4. The competition is open to all undergraduate and graduate students enrolled in the faculties of law at the University of Alberta and the University of Calgary, excluding members of the Editorial Board of the Alberta Law Review who are responsible for judging the submissions. Articling students in Alberta, the Northwest Territories, Nunavut and the Yukon Territory are also eligible to submit papers.

  5. Papers submitted for courses in Law School are eligible.

  6. The Editorial Board reserves the right to award an honourable mention to deserving entries.

  7. The Editorial Board reserves the right to award or not to award the prizes at their discretion.

  8. The Alberta Law Review reserves the right to first publication of the papers submitted. Previously published papers and papers concurrently submitted to other publications are not eligible for the contest. Only one paper per category may be submitted. 

  9. The author’s name should not appear on the paper. The author’s name, home address, and university or firm should be included in the email to which the contest submission is attached.

  10. Papers commissioned by another organization must be accompanied by written permission from that organization.

  11. Entries must be submitted as a Word document to:

William Morrow Essay Contest
Alberta Law Review
Email: info@albertalawreview.com


PRIZES

There are three categories in the contest:

General Essays

First Prize: $1,000.00
Second Prize: $500.00

Notes & Case Comments

First Prize: $500.00

Law or Administration of Justice in the North

First Prize: $500.00


PAST WINNERS

 

Year

1st Place General Category

2nd Place General Category

Case Comment

Administration of Justice in the North

2021

Amy Durand

Allison Jandura

Darren Wagner

Alexander Kinrade

2020

Alissa Ricioppo

Moira Lavoie

Nate Gartke

Bradley Mills

2019

Ben Thronson

Joanne Cave

Brianna Walsh

N/A

2018

Kathleen Renaud

Moira Lavoie

Peter Cotton-O’Brien

N/A

2017

Tory Hibbitt

Matthew Schneider

Michael Barrett

N/A

2016

Andrew Caniff

Jacob Marchel

N/A

Jessi Casebeer

2015

Samantha Barker

Adrienne Funk

Michael Low

N/A

2014

Darren Schmidt

Greg Weber

N/A

Simon Elzen- Hoskyn

2013

Keith Guinn

Andrew Phypers

N/A

Alison Wegner

2012

Ciara J. Toole

Melissa Jakobfi

N/A

Daryk Gorrie

2011

Joshua Fraese

Scott Nicol

N/A

N/A

2010

Paul Chiswell

Taylor Decarie

Deborah Book

N/A

2009

Rosalind Greenwood

Ryan Krushelnitsky

Kyla Conner

Katherine Jamieson

2008

Sandra Malcolm

Megan Rosborough

Monic Willner

N/A

2007

Karen Rana

Derek Lai

N/A

N/A

2006

Kyle Kashuba

Claire Bond

N/A

N/A

2005

Michael Solowan

Melodie Hope

Joshua Jantzi

N/A

2004

Fiona Moore

Charmane Sing

Alyn James Johnson

Lisa Statt

 

2003

Laura Estep

Andrew Wallace

Lesley Akst

Moira R. Vane

 

2002

Sonya Morgan

Mark Sawyer

N/A

N/A

2001

Susan Turner

N/A

N/A

Tamara Friesen

2000

Ayla Akgungor

Leah Teasdale

Ron Goltz

N/A

1999

Naomi Nind

Gordon Van Vliet

Ken Ihas

Kelly Gallagher- MacKay

1998

Colin Feasby

Jay Haugen

Ryan Smith

N/A

1997

Anthony Cioni

Cassandra Haraba

Heather Steinke

Took Whiteley

1996

Elizabeth Halka

Elizabeth Seale

Robert A. Fata

Sharon Venne

1995

Colleen Cebuliak

M. Rachel Colabella

Rob Warren

Jenny Scott

 

1994

Steven Penney

Janice Wright

Ian Dundas

Kathleen Kendrick

1993

Scott Moore

Peter Barber

Craig Bell

N/A

1992

Sandra Petersson

Bryce Tingle

N/A

Clay McLeod

1991

Mark L. Rudoff

Judith Holmes

N/A

N/A

1990

Timothy Faries

Michael Tilleard

Joan Bilsland

Robert Roth

1989

Tom Achtymichuk

N/A

N/A

Award not yet created

1988

Eeva Komulainen

Helen Ward

Dino Bottos

 

1987

Peter Michalyshyn

David Venour

Marilyn Herrmann

 

1986

Allan Donovan

Joan Hampl

N/A

 

1985

Linda Long

Peter Wong

Kate Welsh

 

1984

Joyce Schlosser

Ron Sawchuk

Michael Bailey

 

1983

Bernard Funston

Mavis Berquist

N/A